Holi, also known as the “Festival of Colors,” is one of the most important and vibrant festivals in India. The festival, which is celebrated in the Hindu month of Phalguna (February/March), marks the victory of good over evil and the arrival of spring. One of the most famous places to celebrate Holi is in the small village of Nandgaon, located in the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh.

Nandgaon, also known as the “village of Lord Krishna,” is considered to be the birthplace of Lord Krishna’s consort, Radha. The village is famous for its Holi celebrations, which are said to be the closest representation of Lord Krishna’s playful ways.

Holi, also known as the “Festival of Colors,” is one of the most important and vibrant festivals in India. The festival, which is celebrated in the Hindu month of Phalguna (February/March), marks the victory of good over evil and the arrival of spring. One of the most famous places to celebrate Holi is in the small village of Nandgaon, located in the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh.

Nandgaon, also known as the “village of Lord Krishna,” is considered to be the birthplace of Lord Krishna’s consort, Radha. The village is famous for its Holi celebrations, which are said to be the closest representation of Lord Krishna’s playful ways.

The Holi celebrations in Nandgaon begin a week before the actual festival, with the preparation of traditional sweets and delicacies. Villagers can be seen making gujiya, mathri, and dahi bhalla, which are traditional Holi sweets. Local markets are also filled with vibrant colors and traditional Holi items such as pichkaris (water guns), abeer (colored powder), and thandai (a sweet and nutty drink).

On the day of Holi, the village comes alive with the sounds of devotional songs, drums and horns. The main attraction of the day is the Lathmar Holi, where women of the village playfully beat men with sticks, as a symbol of Radha’s playful teasing of Lord Krishna. The men, in turn, try to protect themselves with shields while singing devotional songs.

After the Lathmar Holi, the entire village gathers in the main square for a grand celebration. People can be seen smearing each other with abeer and water, dancing to the beats of dhols (drums) and singing traditional Holi songs. The atmosphere is filled with joy and laughter, and the streets are filled with colors.

One of the unique aspects of the Holi celebrations in Nandgaon is the Radha Rani temple, where devotees gather to offer prayers and seek blessings. The temple is beautifully decorated with flowers, colors and lights, and the air is filled with the aroma of incense and the sound of devotional songs.

In addition to the traditional Holi celebrations, Nandgaon also offers visitors a chance to experience the local culture and tradition. Visitors can take a stroll through the village, visit the homes of local residents, and participate in other traditional activities such as pottery and weaving.

Another highlight of the Holi celebration in Nandgaon is the traditional Holi food. Visitors can savor a variety of delicious local delicacies such as dahi bhalla, gujiya, mathri, thandai and many more.

Overall, the Holi celebrations in Nandgaon are a unique and vibrant experience. The village comes alive with colors, music, and laughter, and offers visitors a chance to experience the traditional customs and culture of India. The Lathmar Holi, the Radha Rani temple, the traditional food and the local activities makes it a perfect destination to celebrate Holi.

In conclusion, Nandgaon is a small village in India that is famous for its unique and vibrant Holi celebrations. The village, known as the birthplace of Lord Krishna’s consort Radha, offers a close representation of Lord Krishna’s playful ways. The Holi celebration in Nandgaon starts a week before the actual festival with the preparation of traditional sweets and delicacies, Lathmar Holi, a grand celebration, Radha Rani temple, traditional food, local activities, and the opportunity to experience the local culture and tradition.

When is Lathmar Holi celebrated in Nandgaon, Mathura (2022)?

‘Lathmar Holi’ arose as a memory of love between Lord Krishna and Radha. The people of Nandgaon and Barsana depict their life moments during this ‘Lathmar Holi’, which starts from March 11, 2022.

Why is Lathmar Holi celebrated ?

Lathmar Holi is a festival celebrated in the town of Barsana, located in the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh. It is celebrated in the month of Phalguna (February/March) and marks the start of the spring season. The festival is unique in that it is celebrated in reverse, with women chasing and beating men with sticks.

The origins of Lathmar Holi can be traced back to the legend of Radha and Krishna. According to Hindu mythology, Radha was a cowherd girl who was a great devotee of Lord Krishna. The two were known for their playful teasing and Krishna would often visit Radha in Barsana. One day, while playing with Radha and her companions, Krishna and his friends playfully teased the women, which led to a playful fight between the sexes.

To commemorate this event, the festival of Lathmar Holi is celebrated in Barsana. During the festival, the men from the neighboring village of Nandgaon visit Barsana to play Holi with the women. However, instead of applying color and throwing water on each other, the women of Barsana chase and beat the men with sticks made of bamboo, called ‘lathis’. The men are expected to protect themselves with shields and are often dressed in traditional Indian attire.

Lathmar Holi is also believed to be a celebration of the victory of good over evil. The festival is a symbol of the triumph of the feminine energy, represented by Radha and the women of Barsana, over the masculine energy represented by Krishna and the men of Nandgaon.

The festival is celebrated over a period of five days, with each day having a specific significance. The first day is known as ‘Chhoti Holi’, which marks the beginning of the preparations for the main festival. The second day is ‘Holi’, which is celebrated with the men visiting Barsana. The third day is ‘Rangbhari Ekadashi’, which is a day of fasting for the women. The fourth day is ‘Rang Panchami’, which marks the end of the festival and is celebrated with the women visiting Nandgaon. The fifth day is ‘Bhairo-ka-Dhuan’, which is a day of rest and relaxation.

Overall, Lathmar Holi is a unique and colorful festival that is celebrated with great enthusiasm and joy in the town of Barsana. It is a celebration of the playful and loving relationship between Radha and Krishna, and a reminder of the triumph of good over evil.

How to reach Nandgaon and Barsana, Mathura?

Planning to enjoy these festive days in Mathura? Lighten up your soul by adding Holi days to your travel diary. 

You can visit Mathura by reaching either Delhi or Agra cities. From there, you can take a taxi or bus to Mathura. 

You can also opt for airport services from Delhi or Agra terminals.

The most time and cost saving option is the train.

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